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Re: lindaC

Posted by Melinda on 1/20/07
(11) Comments
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    On 1/20/07, LindaC in OK wrote:

    > to me the syringe has more control than a spoon. I control
    > the syringe. With the spoon birds are expected to lap it
    > up? I don't think so.
    >
    > LindaC


    Spoken as a true syringe feeder would say.
    If you have ever spoon fed any species of bird you would know
    that baby birds are NOT expected to lap up formula.
    The bent spoon is the closest to the natural shape of the
    parent bird's mandible. In other words, it feels very much
    like the mother's beak would.
    The formula intake is controlled by the baby and this is best
    in order to prevent aspiration. You might have "control" as
    you say, but trust me, there are more people out there that
    shouldn't have a syringe in their hands when it comes to
    feeding a baby. And what is better; you controlling the
    formula or the baby?
    Another point to consider, and this is a biggie, many syringe
    feeders are careless and do not test formula temperatures. The
    poor baby has no choice but to swallow that which is being
    pushed down his throat. A bird that is allowed to "taste" the
    formula and "control" the intake will NOT take formula that is
    too hot because it senses it on his tongue and will spit it out
    immediately should it be too hot. You won't find crop burn
    among spoon feeders.
    Also, there are numerous beak deformities caused by syringe
    feeders due to improper insertion of the syringe on one side of
    the beak. You'll not find a bird's beak that has been damaged
    by a spoon as the baby attach's it's beak to the spoon evenly
    from the front, much like the natural contour of the mother
    bird.
    If a person chooses to syringe feed, that's fine, but get your
    facts straight before you pooh pooh the alternate and more safe
    method that the spoon provides.
    The only thing a syringe does is make hand feeding faster and
    this not only puts the baby at risk, but it also takes away
    quality bonding time when a baby is spoon fed.