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Re: new owner of macaw

Posted by Rick on 1/07/09
(8) Comments
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    On 1/07/09, Rick wrote:
    > On 1/07/09, judy wrote:
    >> On 1/06/09, GreyLady wrote:
    >>> On 1/06/09, judy wrote:
    >>>> hello..i have just recently became the proud owner of a
    >>>> maccall parrot..her name is sadie..sadie is eating well
    >>>> and drinking well, she is adopting to her surroundings
    >>>> well...BUT SHE IS BITEIN AT ME..I try to pet her, she does
    >>>> shake with me and let me touch her beek but she is like
    >>>> trying to bite me..can anyone help me figure this problem
    >>>> out? She will yell momma when im not in the room and seems
    >>>> to settle when i go in..i want to get to where i can take
    >>>> her out of her cage any suggestions on how to calm her
    >>>> down..
    >>>
    >>> Some more specific information will help us to give you the
    >>> best help.
    >>> What do you mean by recent? A few days, few weeks, what?
    >>> How long have you had her?
    >>> Is this you first experience with a large parrot?
    >>> Do you know how old she is?
    >>> Do you know why the previous owner let her go?
    >>> Do you know if you are her second home, third, what?
    >>> Does she "snap" at you with the beak or just reach for your
    >>> hand or finger?
    >>> Does she only do it at certain times, like when you ask her
    >>> to step up or if you are trying to touch her, other than
    >>> stepping up?
    >>> What do you do when you think she is about to bite?
    >>> Are you reaching your hand inside the cage or does it happen
    >>> when she is out of the cage?
    >>> The more information we have, the better we may be able to
    >>> help.
    >> I RECEIVED SADIE ON DECEMBER 31, 2008 I AM THE THIRD OWNER
    >> OF HER, SHE IS GOING ON 9 YEAR OLD, THE PREVIOUS OWNER GAVE
    >> HER TO MY FRIEND BECAUSE THEY DIDNT HAVE TIME FOR HER, MY
    >> FRIEND GAVE HER TO ME CAUSE HER HUSBAND COULDNT STAND THE
    >> SCREAMING...SHE SNAPS AT ME WITH HER BEAK, WHEN I TRY TO TOUCH
    >> HER. I TRY NOT TO PULL MY HAND BACK, BUT SHE IS SO QUICK MAKES
    >> ME JUMP AND I DO PULL MY HAND BACK. HER OWNER THE DAY I GOT
    >> HER GOT BIT BY HER HARD, MADE DENT AND DREW BLOOD..THAT WAS
    >> BEFORE WE EVEN ATTEMPT TO MOVE HER SHE WAS SHOWING ME SOME
    >> STUFF SHE DOES WITH HER AND WASNT PAYING ANY ATTENTION AND
    >> SADIE PULLED HER FINGER IN THE CAGE AND CLAMPED DOWN ON HER
    >> FINGER..SADIE IS A VERY SMART BIRD, I JUST WANT TO LOVE HER
    >> AND GIVE HER A GOOD HOME..
    >
    >
    > Judy, it sounds as though Sadie had not time to acclimate to your
    > friends house before she was rehomed again. This is very stressful
    > on birds. Most likely the reason for snapping at your friend in
    > the manner she did. Sadie was lashing out and venting her
    > frustration in the only way she knows how. BITING!
    >
    > First and foremost information I was given when I first got my
    > birds is, you have to put yourself in their little shoes and think
    > like they think, feel like they feel, and view the world from
    > their eyes. Imagine how you would feel if you were uprooted from
    > your loving home, then placed in a strange home where you know no
    > one, not to mention 2 homes in such a short manner, and expect to
    > be a perfect angel at that. This is very traumatizing to birds,
    > not all, but most. They don't know what they have done to deserve
    > being taken away from their loved ones and placed with total
    > strangers. Understanding them is the first step to "Understanding"
    > them, if you will.
    >
    > Having a Macaw is like having a 2 year old for the rest of your life.
    >
    > Sadie needs to be placed in an area where she can interact with
    > your family, such as in the living room, not stuck in a room where
    > she can only hear her surroundings. They are very social
    > creatures, such as dogs. They too need stimulation throughout the
    > day, playing, praising, petting, talking to, singing, etc.
    >
    > Best advice is to place her in an area where she can view you and
    > your daily routines, an area where you can pass by her several
    > times during the day and just talk with her(softly)and interact.
    > Don't push yourself on her, when she is ready she will let you
    > know. It generally takes about a month or even longer for most
    > birds to acclimate, and with her being rehomed twice in such a
    > short time, she will definitely need to time to adjust. Possibly
    > then she will have gotten use to her new surroundings and you will
    > see a different behavior in her. Time is key right now for you and
    > Sadie.
    >
    > A word of advice regarding pulling your hand back the way you did.
    > It is a natural instinct on our parts to react just as you did,
    > but Sadie may see this as a game and keep on doing this to get a
    > reaction out of you, or better yet, she may see this as her
    > defense to keep you away from her. PATIENTS. I cannot stress this
    > enough.
    >
    > By the way , we have a screamer as well. What we do when he
    > screams is tell him in a calm neutral tone "NO", or if he is
    > screaming and we are out of the room, we don't go in the room
    > until he has stopped. Ours screaming is for attention, which he is
    > not lacking, but he thinks so. Or another thing we do is put him
    > back in his cage for a quiet time, aka time out. This seems to
    > help as well.
    >
    > Just when you think you have done enough, do it some more. And
    > when you get that first glimpse of reassurance from Sadie, you
    > will know it has all been worth it.
    >
    > Remember...........PATIENTS, PERSERVERENCE, TIME, UNDERSTANDING,
    > COMPASSION and an Ocassional bite along the way....Sorry, I had to
    > put that in as well, because it will happen, makes for a happy
    > feathered friend.
    >
    > I hope this has helped. I know I have not given you as much as
    > advice as you need. There is so much to learn, everyday is a new
    > day, but in the end the rewards are wonderful. Good luck, keep us
    > posted.
    > Rick
    >

    One more thing to add, just as Grey Lady had asked. You have to
    learn to read their body language. The striking of Sadie may or may
    not have been an intentional strike, but a way of communicating as
    well. Hard to say since we weren't there to view it. You see they
    use their beaks as a third hand, and maybe she was wanting to do a
    "taste test" (sounds corny, I know) on you, then again maybe not.
    Maybe it was intentional.

    Were her head feathers ruffled up? I call it their little Afro when
    they do this. This is a indication that they are on guard and most
    likely not wanting to bothered. And watch the dilation (pinning) of
    the eyes. This will tell you a great deal as well. If they are
    pinned...look out. She may strike.

    They have their cranky days as well, even the sweetest of birds. And
    this time of year with breeding season is another reason to be on
    guard. We have a female that is the sweetest, but has her cranky
    days and will bite down, not hard, but enough to say "I got you".

    Okay, enough for now, have to take care of feathered friends.
    Rick